Archive for the BOOK REVIEWS Category

Review: Journeys to the Other Shore. R.L.Euben

Posted in BOOK REVIEWS on December 1, 2007 by heretic

Review by Francis Robinson.

click here for review.

Review: Daya Somasundaram, Scarred Minds: The Psychological Impact of War on Sri Lankan Tamils. New Delhi: Sage Publications 1998. (Rs 425 cloth).

Posted in BOOK REVIEWS on December 1, 2007 by heretic

REVIEW BY ROHAN BASTIN

Pogroms, assassinations, suicide bombings, torture, rape and ‘disappearances’ are some of the violent acts that have destroyed many Sri Lankan lives over the last two decades. Violence has occurred throughout the small island nation, both between and within the major ethnic groups. None has been spared, but the principal victims have been the poorer and weaker social strata, and especially the inhabitants of the once densely populated Jaffna Peninsula. Many of this area’s Tamil inhabitants have been forced to become refugees both in Sri Lanka and abroad, while the rest have for various reasons remained and attempted to preserve their lives in the face of tremendous deprivation, violence and suffering. Scarred Minds recounts the psychological impact of such a prolonged conflict on the Jaffna population, focusing especially on the late 1980s when State violence escalated. Continue reading

REVIEW: Enemy Lines: Warfare, Childhood, and Play in Batticaloa (Margaret Trawick)

Posted in BOOK REVIEWS on December 1, 2007 by heretic

DAVID LANCY reviewing

Enemy Lines: Warfare, Childhood, and Play in Batticaloa, by Margaret Trawick. Berkeley: University of California Press. 2007. xii+308 pp.
Reviewed in Ethos 35.4 by David F. Lancy, Professor of Anthropology, Utah State University

The title and subtitle reflect the fact that this work has two foci. The first theme—[Behind] Enemy Lines—is a journalistic account of the lives of Sri Lankan villagers who live in the shadow of an intermittent civil war. Trawick’s history of this war is thorough and meticulous. While I was aware of the general outlines of this conflict, her account reveals a much greater complexity on the ground. For example, while there are sectarian differences between the Tamil minority and Sinhalese majority, many of the rebel supporters are, in fact, Christian. Sectarian differences seem, in other words, to be much less central to the conflict than the issue of Tamil disenfranchisement.

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Review – Faithlines: Muslim Conceptions of Islam And Society (Karachi: Oxford University Press, 2002): R. Hassan.

Posted in BOOK REVIEWS on December 1, 2007 by heretic

S. Zainuddin

reviewing
Riaz Hassan: Faithlines: Muslim Conceptions of Islam And Society (Karachi: Oxford University Press, 2002) xviii + 276pp., $49.95 (hardback).
For Journal of Sociology. 40.3 (Sept 2004): 306(3). Expanded Academic ASAP. Gale. Flinders University Library. 23 Dec. 2007
<http://find.galegroup.com/itx/infomark.do?&contentSet=IAC-Documents&type=retrieve&tabID=T002&prodId=EAIM&docId=A123675745&source=gale&userGroupName=flinders&version=1.0&gt;.

COPYRIGHT 2004 Addison Wesley Longman Higher Education

Religious traditions are not practised by their followers in any socially pure or context-independent form. These traditions are shaped by historical and political experiences, along with interpretations of society and its constituting elements. Religion is, therefore, neither beyond space and time nor above human interpretations. Its virtues are not transcendental but immanent. Every religion operates in a social setting and is crucially influenced in its ideals and values by local conditions. The followers of religion, it needs to be emphasized, do not blindly conform to these values and rules of religious conduct. Continue reading